I heart vocabulary.

Posted on November 9, 2011. Filed under: Improving your writing skills, Spelling, Vocabulary, Words | Tags: , , , , , , |

I’m posting this from my new tablet, and its is actually quicker to use than a keyboard.

On Thursday, I plan on writing a post about freelance writing. I’m planning to include information about various content mill sites, the work invoked, the application processes and how often they payout. So, look forward to that? 🙂

Sadly all you get to read today is a rant on how I love words and a few vocabulary words.

Vocabulary! It rocks, in my opinion. Perhaps I’m biased because I’m a nerd, but I find words fascinating. They gives us the ability to externalize our internal thoughts; how is that not fascinating? To me, words are like colors. You can buy the 12 or 24 pack if you like to keep your life simple; however, you are going to have a difficult time expressing yourself precisely. If it were me, I’d buy the largest package of crayons they sold. Why limit your ability to express yourself with a weak vocabulary? The more words you know, the more likely you are to have people understand you. This just came to me, “Vocabulary is like a box of chocolates; you never know what you’re gonna get.” Oh, random Forrest Gump reference, but a great movie.

AND NOW, time for the words of the day:

Junket  \JUHNG-kit\

noun

1. A trip, usually by an official or legislative comittee, paid out of public funds to ostensibly obtain information.

2. A sweet, custard-like food of flavored milk curdled with rennet.

3. A pleasure excursion, as a picnic or outing.

verb

1. To go on a junket {no way, gtfo!}

2. To entertain; feast; regale.

Examples: “This afternoon, we went on a junket to the park.” “Since he loves sweet things, one of his favorite deserts is junket”

Voluble  \väl-yů-bəl\

adjective

1. Speaking readily and rapidly; talkative.

2. Easily rolling or turning.

Example: “She was a voluble informer due to her strong memory.”

Eponymous  \i-pänə-məs\ — adjective — Of, relating to, or being the person for whom something is named.

Example: “Adjectives such as Elizabethan, Victorian and Edwardian show how the names of certain British monarchs have become eponymous for particular time periods and styles.”

❤ jt

[EDIT: I was sick when I posted this, so I just found my spelling and grammatical errors. Yes, I was lazy when I first posted it and didn’t proofread.]

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