Defining our Person-hood by our Passions

There are some people in the world who are born with a destiny in-hand: people who are meant to do something and are gifted with the passion to do it. Passion is an integral aspect for certain abilities. You don’t come across musicians who are lackadaisical about their music, just like you don’t come across writers who are indifferent concerning the meaning of “lackadaisical.” And with this zeal comes your duty. If you were born to be a great pianist, then you are cheating the world of a gift it deserves.

Before we go any further, if you want to know more about Personhood:

Personhood: An Essential Characteristic of the Human Species

This image mimics the passion I feel when it comes to the written word. Thank you, Mark Rothko.

You might argue that having a talent does not necessitate a responsibility to follow it and logically, you’d be right. But then comes the question, do you want to live a completely logical life or will you open yourself up to vulnerability and emotion? It is in the very nature of an artist to choose the latter. So before I continue, let me go ahead and ostentatiously throw myself into that rare breed known as artists and explain why I could never deny myself this gift. I believe that any artist would come to the same conclusion; so, why deny a single person a chance to experience your gift, especially when it comes so naturally to you?

On Language and the Possibility of Prescriptivism

I consider blogging part of my job now. When you want to become a professional writer, you have to take every opportunity you can to write and to learn… and to have your grammar ripped apart. I admit, I haven’t been a saint when it comes to pleasing the grammar gods, but I haven’t been intentionally naughty, either.

I consider myself a writer with the best intentions; I’m just not always sure how to use them.

That is why I use every resource I can to learn about what’s considered “proper.”

I think human beings should take speaking as seriously as they take walking or listening to music. If someone was bad at walking, wouldn’t they do what they could to improve? Wouldn’t they have a natural inclination to want to walk like everyone else? As people, we’ve been given the gift of walking and we expect to be able to use it. If someone was poor regarding their use of grammar (and speaking in my humble opinion) wouldn’t they want to improve their English so that they could speak properly and be able to converse with the majority of society?

These days, there are so many different vernaculars, which are a close off-shoot of English, that deeming one particular version as “correct” is impossible these days, even for the experts. When writing professionally, you must decide between using the MLA, AP, or Chicago style.

Using abbreviations such as “IMO” or “lol” is typical of Internet-Speak, or geek-speak if you prefer. People who frequent online communities like Facebook, and especially online games like World of Warcraft and Fortnight, use their own language filled with internet slang like the above examples.

I believe that there exists, floating somewhere out in the fibers of space and our minds, THE manual for correct grammar, even if we’ll never know it. Call me a prescriptivist about language, but having to decide amongst three different styles in which to write seems to defeat the purpose of having a “style guide.” How can it be called a “guide!” They should simply be called “suggestions, that are usually wrong.”

Granted, I’ll only be using one style per article or paper, so it’s not as though I’m balancing multiple style guides in my head while I write. The point is just that the linguistic prescriptivist in me believes there is only one correct language, that’s used universally. To elaborate a bit more: it’s kind of like math equations, where language is an equation. But, it’s all Wishful Thinking. Too many classes in The Philosophy of Language!

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I found some comics from my favorite site, along with an interesting debate on prescriptivism with Harry Potter as the example!

Link: Prescriptivism vs Descriptivism: A Very English Affair